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The privilege to dream

March 2006, upon arriving in Kenya I was preparing to spend the day in a small wooden building that was our orphanage. This is memorable to me for a number of reasons: it was the first time I would do artwork with the HALO supported youth in this …

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Updates

It has been over a month since my first post so I think it is time for some progress updates. Two major events have occurred:1) I bought my plane ticket.2) I got my visa.I’m all set! Well, almost. Next week is my last week working at Enterprise. Then it is off to Indiana for the weekend to have one last college …

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Updates

It has been over a month since my first post so I think it is time for some progress updates. Two major events have occurred:1) I bought my plane ticket.2) I got my visa.I’m all set! Well, almost. Next week is my last week working at Enterprise. T…

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Share the credit, take the blame

About 10 years ago, I had a martial arts instructor give me this advice that will stay with me for the rest of my life: Share the credit, take the blame. This simple statement, when applied to our daily lives, keeps us accountable. If we did something like show up to class late, it was our job to take responsibility. Nobody wanted to hear about the wreck on the highway or how it was someone else’s fault. We just said “it was poor planning on my part” and moved on.
This month’s life skill for HALO is Accountability: The act of being responsible for one’s actions.
For HALO youth, this is especially important. We recently had a young lady take her first step to achieving her dream of becoming a lawyer by accepting an Apprenticeship at Krigel and Krigel law firm in Kansas City. During her training at the HALO Center that prepared her for this endeavor, she learned that is imperative that she learns to be over prepared and willing to take full responsibility for her actions in the workplace. If she shows her strong desire to be in that profession, openness to constructive criticism, and tenacious work ethic, this position could lead to a brighter future. The possibilities are endless.
It takes courage to be held accountable. We set goals and have self-discipline toward those goals. When we step back and to held accountable to those goals it can be ugly at times, especially when someone else is involved. But facing that ugly is what leads us to growth and success.  There are always ways to improve or drop our little self-protective excuses we make every day for our short comings or laziness. 
I believe we may all learn from our youth who are so committed to their dreams and willing to be held accountable. This spirit drives them through adversity and on to the lives they deserve.

If you are interested in learning more about our Apprenticeship Program and how you or your business may get involved, email chelseaherzberg@haloworldwide.org
“Many people have the wrong idea of happiness. It is not obtained through self-gratification but through fidelity to a worthy purpose.” Helen Keller

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8 years old with many layers

This week, Chelsea Herzberg, HALO Center Director shares a story about a talented youth in the Kansas City Center.

8 year old Dakota unknowingly quoted a famous artist. In an interview, artist Robert Rauschenberg was asked, “How do you know when you are finished with a painting?” and Rauschenberg replied, “When I sell it”. Dakota was sharing with HALO Center volunteer, Heidi Wetzel, about the different layers on his painting. Heidi asked Dakota how he would know when he was finished with his piece. Dakota simply replied, “When I give it away.” We’ve got a young artist on our hands!


Dakota also impresses with his vocabulary and intention. When asked about his self-portrait, Dakota went into deep detail about why he chose to layer different colors and why he chose the colors he did. You can see bits of blonde hair poking out above brownish-purple paint; Dakota spent a lot of time adding detail to his shirt, face and hair. Upon what appeared to be a nearly finished piece, Dakota mixed together red, blue and a touch of black and applied as a top layer over his face and shirt.



Layers return in another work of art done by Dakota. In this piece (a quilt block to be added together with many other HALO Center youth’s blocks to create a community art piece that will be displayed throughout Kansas City) Dakota uses black material to symbolize mountains, brown for buildings that make up the cityscape and blue and purple to represent the people living within the city.Dakota has chosen to lay a striped piece of cloth on top to signify how the community quilt will ultimately bring the city together.

Robert Rauschenberg started his art career here in Kanas City at the Art Institute in 1947. Throughout his life, Rauschenberg was able to live in or travel to Paris, North Carolina, New York, Rome, Florence, France, India, China… to name a few. It is inspiring to see how art can transform your life. We can’t wait to see how it will continue to transform the life of young Dakota and many other homeless, foster and at-risk youth in Kansas City.
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Hello and welcome to the first of many blogs!  Seeing as this is my very first blog entry for my journey in Uganda and I still don’t leave for three months I must bore you with my letter of support. The letter will give you a great idea of where I am coming from and where I am going. I …

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Out Of Africa 2012-03-04 01:07:00


Hello and welcome to the first of many blogs!
 Seeing as this is my very first blog entry for my journey in Uganda and I still don’t leave for three months I must bore you with my letter of support. The letter will give you a great idea of where I am coming from and where I am going. I sent this letter to family and friends for two reasons: the first reason is to let everyone know where I’ll be for the next two years, and second is to help generate support for my time in Uganda since I will be working on a volunteer basis. 
As many of you know, I have had a long-standing love for the continent of Africa. I find the history, people, and cultures of Africa and its many countries to be fascinating. While attending Indiana University, I had the privilege of spending a semester studying at the University of Ghana. My time in Ghana solidified my passion for Africa, and I knew then my life would always be somehow intertwined with Africa and its people.  

Africa makes up 20% of Earth’s land mass and is home to one billion of the seven billion people on Earth. Although Africa is rich in culture and natural resources, its long and turbulent history of colonialism, corruption, civil wars, drought, famine, and unsuccessful development has caused nearly half of Africans (that is almost 500,000,000 people!) to live in crushing poverty. I feel it is my calling to help the people of Africa who are suffering in unlivable conditions. I believe if I am able to improve the life of one person I am making a positive difference in the world. This brings me to my plans which I would like to share with you.

In order to make a true difference in the lives of people in Africa I have decided to commit the next two years, starting in May, 2012, to serve on a volunteer basis as an International Ambassador for The HALO Foundation, a 501(c)(3) nonprofit charitable organization. HALO stands for Helping Art Liberate Orphans. HALO’s mission is to improve the lives of orphans around the world by providing them with food, water, shelter, clothing, education, and art therapy. Many of the children HALO supports have witnessed war, disease, death, and other unimaginable hardships. In order to help the children work through and express their emotions HALO utilizes art therapy, which has been very successful. I fully support HALO’s mission and its approach to development and change in third world countries. HALO currently supports five orphanages in Kampala, Uganda. As HALO’s International Ambassador, I will serve as the link between the homes in Uganda and HALO’s offices in the United States.  My duties will include visiting each home weekly, implementing art and other programs, managing the budgets for each home, and assuring the children are reaching their full potential through future focused programs.

While I was in Africa, I saw the poverty that exists, and although I did not even see the worst of it, I knew I could not continue to live my life without trying my hardest to help those in need. However, I cannot do this alone. Your support, both moral and financial, is greatly appreciated. Your tax-deductible donation will be received by The HALO Foundation and used to support my role in Uganda of helping children like Joy (featured in picture). If any donations are unused after my time in Uganda they will be used to support the greatest needs of the HALO children. To read more about Joy and how you can help other children, please visit HALO’s website at www.haloworldwide.org. If you would like to make a donation, please fill out the included card, and please know I appreciate your support by e-mails and phone calls just as much as by a financial contribution.

Sincerely, with love and hope for the future,

Mary Pryse

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HALO Foundation plans auction

HALO Foundation plans auction Michelle Brooks mbrooks@newstribu2ne.com PUBLICATION: Jefferson City News-Tribune (MO) SECTION: Escape DATE: February 23, 2012 Page: 23 A night immersed in the arts should elicit funds to support a Ugandan girls orphanage and a new activity for local youths. The 4th Annual HALO Foundation ArtReach Auction will be held at 6:30 p.m. March 2 at Capitol Plaza …